Accessibility Statement

Beginning January 1, 2021: all public websites and web content posted after January 1, 2012 must meet WCAG 2.0 Level AA other than criteria 1.2.4 (live captions) and 1.2.5 (pre-recorded audio descriptions)

Web Content Accessibility Guidelines (WCAG) 2.1 covers a wide range of recommendations for making Web content more accessible. Following these guidelines will make content more accessible to a wider range of people with disabilities, including accommodations for blindness and low vision, deafness and hearing loss, limited movement, speech disabilities, photosensitivity, and combinations of these, and some accommodation for learning disabilities and cognitive limitations; but will not address every user need for people with these disabilities. These guidelines address accessibility of web content on desktops, laptops, tablets, and mobile devices. Following these guidelines will also often make Web content more usable to users in general.

Conformance Status
We firmly believe that the internet should be available and accessible to everyone. We are committed to providing a website that is accessible to the widest possible audience, regardless of circumstance and ability.

To fulfill this promise, we aim to adhere as closely as possible to the World Wide Web Consortium’s (W3C) Web Content Accessibility Guidelines 2.1 (WCAG 2.1) at the AA level. These guidelines explain how to make web content more accessible to people with a wide array of disabilities. Complying with those guidelines helps us provide a site that is accessible to all people, from the blind to the motor impaired.

This website utilizes various technologies all meant to make it more accessible. We utilize an interface that allows persons with specific disabilities to adjust the website’s UI (user interface) and design it to their personal needs. This interface replaces the conventional approach to accessibility in which all users are presented with the same diminished interface or design.

Here are some of the interface’s capabilities:

  • Font adjustments - users can increase and decrease its size, change its family (type), adjust the spacing, alignment, line height, and more.
  • Colour adjustments - users can select various colour contrast profiles such as light, dark, inverted and monochrome. Additionally, users can swap colour schemes of titles, texts, and backgrounds, with over 7 different colouring options.
  • Animations - epileptic users can stop all running animations with the click of a button. Animations controlled by the interface include videos, GIFs and CSS flashing transitions.
  • Content highlighting – users can choose to emphasize important elements such as links and titles. They can also choose to highlight focused or hovered elements only.
  • Audio muting – users with hearing devices may experience headaches or other issues due to automatic audio playing. This option lets users mute the entire website instantly.

Despite our very best efforts to allow anybody to adjust the website to their needs, it is possible that there will still be pages or sections that are not fully accessible, are in the process of becoming accessible, or are lacking an adequate technological solution to make them accessible. Still, we are constantly improving the accessibility interface, adding, updating and improving its options and features, and developing and adopting new technologies. All this is meant to reach the optimal level of accessibility, at all times, and in accordance with technological advancements.

If you’ve discovered a malfunction, if you find any aspect of the interface difficult to use, or if you have ideas for improvement, we’ll be happy to hear from you. Simply click on the “Feedback” button at the bottom of the interface, and fill out the feedback form. Alternatively, if you wish to speak with the website owner directly, please email the below-mentioned address.

Understanding the Four Principles of Accessibility
The guidelines are organized around the following four principles, which lay the foundation necessary for anyone to access and use Web content. Anyone who wants to use the Web must have content that is:

  1. Perceivable - Information and user interface components must be presentable to users in ways they can perceive.
    • This means that users must be able to perceive the information being presented (it can’t be invisible to all of their senses)
  2. Operable - User interface components and navigation must be operable.
    • This means that users must be able to operate the interface (the interface cannot require interaction that a user cannot perform)
  3. Understandable - Information and the operation of user interface must be understandable.
    • This means that users must be able to understand the information as well as the operation of the user interface (the content or operation cannot be beyond their understanding)
  4. Robust - Content must be robust enough that it can be interpreted reliably by a wide variety of user agents, including assistive technologies.
    • This means that users must be able to access the content as technologies advance (as technologies and user agents evolve, the content should remain accessible)

If any of these are not true, users with disabilities will not be able to use the Web.

We aim to respond to accessibility feedback within 5 business days, and to propose a solution within 10 business days.

AccessibilityCommunication

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